The Emerging Learning Society

The Emerging Learning Society Patrick Blessinger, Habiba Chaoui, Hari Kamali, and Inge Rozendal The advent of the Digital Revolution (also known as the Third Industrial Revolution – circa 1960 CE to 2000 CE) ushered in the Information Age. This period was characterized by the ubiquitous use of information and communication technologies, especially digital technologies such as computers, robotics, and the internet. During this period, relatively simple data-based systems (to process raw facts) gradually developed into more sophisticated information-based systems (to support human decision-making) and eventually developed into more complex knowledge-based systems (to generate new knowledge). At each level of processing (data to information to knowledge), more meaning, context, and value are being added to the sense-making process. These systems are, if effective, extensions of human intelligence. Since there are inherent limitations and constraints on what the brain and nervous system can do, humans use their intelligence to design and [...]

The Shift Towards Hyper-learning

The Shift Towards Hyper-learningPatrick BlessingerTwo of the most important questions facing higher education today are: how should higher education institutions respond to the dramatic changes occurring in the world today? And, since the consumption and production of knowledge (that is, the learning process) is at the center of all educational institutions, how can higher education adapt and transform their teaching and learning practices and processes to best address these changes? To help answer these questions, it may be helpful to first understand the factors driving the emerging trends in the world today (politically, economically, socially, technologically, and environmentally) and how these trends are impacting higher education.The real-time instantaneity of ubiquitous digital interactions (for example, the integration of social media with wireless, GPS, and mobile technologies), as well as the development of new inventions, discoveries, and innovations, has fundamentally altered our reality – cognitively, psychologically, socially, and physically. The hyper interconnectedness [...]

Learning-Scapes: Cultivating Meaningful and Sustainable Learning Ecosystems

Learning-Scapes: Cultivating Meaningful and Sustainable Learning Ecosystems Patrick Blessinger St. John's University (NYC) and International HETL Association In Being a University (2011, page 143), Ronald Barnett describes his idea of the emerging university of the future. He calls this type of university the ecological university. According to Barnett, the ecological university is not only concerned with protecting and creating a sustainable natural environment but is also concerned about “…a much wider ambit, embracing the personal, social, cultural, institutional and technological environments and knowledge of those environments; in short, the world in its fullest senses.” The ecological university recognizes that it does not operate in isolation of its broader environments. Rather, the ecological university endeavors to cultivate authentic and purposeful interconnections with its broader environments through meaningful and diverse ways of learning and inquiry. Holistic Learning Ecosystem In this sense, a learning-scape may be defined as a conceptual construct that shapes our [...]

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